The Stars Through the Seasons

From a dark location on a clear night you could see 2000-3000 stars. Throughout the year from one location you can see more than 6000 stars.

Our earth is traveling around the sun throughout the year. On average the speed is about 18 miles per second. Therefore, from one month to the next, the earth has traveled millions of miles. It is as if we are on a giant spaceship going around the sun. Every clear night we get to look out of the window of our spaceship earth and see the stars.

In the northern hemisphere, looking to the south, each season we are looking in a different direction millions of miles apart and we see different stars. Toward the north, the stars appear to move in a circle throughout the year, but we see the same stars. For example, the Big Dipper is very low in the fall and very high in the spring.

In the southern hemisphere, the seasonal changes are to the north and the circular pattern is to the south.

Seasonal Constellations

In different seasons the night sky looks to different directions in space, and we see different constellations.
The earth image is derived from 1_Earth_(ELitU).png: Azcolvin429 derivative work: Frédéric MICHEL (1_Earth_(ELitU).png) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

2 thoughts on “The Stars Through the Seasons

  1. I am fortunate to be a personal friend of Jack Megas since the 70s. He is truely an amazing, talented man and so very interesting to listen to. This will certainly be a wonderful site. He has enriched out lives with his wealth of knowledge about astronomy and many other subjects. I will be forwarding this site to all my friends. Thank you

    • Thanks for your visit. I think Jack’s really outstanding work is in the folklore and mythology for each constellation. Be sure to visit often and enjoy those.
      -Kevin

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